HS Academics

Contents

Graduation requirements[edit]

In order to graduate from CAJ, students are required to complete the following courses:


For students graduating in 2021

  • 4 credits Bible (one credit for each year enrolled at CAJ)
  • 8 credits English
  • 1 credit Fine arts
  • 4 credits Foreign language
  • 4 credits Mathematics
  • 4 credits PE/health
  • 4 credits Science
  • 8 credits Social Studies (World History, Comparative Government and Politics, US History, Japanese Culture, Senior Capstone (including the Senior Comprehensives process))
  • Elective credits to add to a total of 48 credits

For students graduating in 2022 and beyond

  • 4 credits Bible (one credit for each year enrolled at CAJ)
  • 8 credits English
  • 2 credits Fine arts
  • 4 credits Foreign language
  • 4 credits Mathematics
  • 4 credits PE/health
  • 4 credits Science
  • 8 credits Social Studies (World History, Comparative Government and Politics, US History, Japanese Culture, Senior Capstone (including the Senior Comprehensives process))
  • Elective credits to add to a total of 50 credits

NOTE: Universities and colleges may require coursework beyond these minimums -- please consult with the guidance counsellors or contact the colleges directly.

Courses Eligible for Each Category[edit]

English: English 9, English 10, English 11, English 12.

Social Studies: World History, Comparative Government and Politics, US History 11, Japanese Culture, Senior Capstone, Psychology, AP Economics.

Mathematics: Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Precalculus, Applied Mathematics, Statistics, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC.

Science: Biology, AP Biology, Chemistry, AP Chemistry, Physics, AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2, Environmental Science, Robotics.

World Languages: Japanese: Foundations, Intermediate, Advanced, Comprehensive; Japanese Composition, Japanese Literature and Society, Japanese Literature: 20th Century Authors, Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III and IV, Effective Reading and Writing.

Fine Arts: Art Design, Ceramics, Drawing and Painting, AP Art & Design, Symphonic Band, Jazz Ensemble, Concert Choir, Chamber Singers, Handbell Ensemble, String Orchestra, Digital Music Design, Yearbook (Matsu).

PE/Health: PE/Health, Strength and Conditioning

Bible: Bible 9, Bible 10/11 Electives (two), Bible 12.

Electives: any course that is not required, from any department.

Special circumstances[edit]

  1. Students who are gone from CAJ for a semester or two and are planning to return are to contact the registrar regarding the schedule they plan to take and are responsible to take classes which meet graduation requirements. If, due to schedule conflicts at the new school, a student is unable to take all expected requirements for CAJ, the registrar will explain the matter to the principal, who will make a recommendation to the head of school for a final decision.
  2. Exceptions to CAJ’s graduation requirements may be granted by the head of school.







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Transcripts, records, and official letters[edit]

Requests for school transcripts, school records including documentation of attendance, enrollment, etc. can be made by contacting the registrar, registrar@caj.ac.jp. All requests should be made one week in advance of the date needed.


High school students needing transcripts for colleges should follow this procedure: Transcripts, High School



Probation policy[edit]

CAJ uses an academic probation system to help students succeed in school. The high school policy is as follows:

  • Failure in any semester course will result in academic probation for a minimum of one semester.
  • Probation status for those failing a course needed for graduation will remain in effect until the student takes and passes that course (or an agreed substitute course) so that the deficiency is removed and the student is back on track toward completing graduation requirements (38 semesters of specified courses + 10 electives = 48 total for an average of 6 per semester and 12 per year).
  • The student must make up the course needed for graduation according to the following schedule:
    • A course failed during first or second semester of the freshman year must be made up prior to the start of the junior year.
    • A course failed during first or second semester of the sophomore year must be made up prior to the start of the senior year.
    • A course failed during first or second semester of the junior year must be made up prior to graduation.
    • A course failed during the senior year must be made up prior to graduation.
  • If the student does not make up the course by the time specified above,
    • The student who failed a course in the freshman or sophomore year will face probable suspension and will not be readmitted until the course is made up.
    • Further, to be readmitted in the proper grade level, the student must have completed appropriate credits for that grade level missed while on suspension.
    • The student who failed a course in the junior or senior year will not graduate at the end of the senior year.
  • If, while on probation, the student fails a second course, or if the student fails two or more courses in one semester, the student will face probable suspension and will not be readmitted until all courses (or agreed upon substitute courses) have been taken and passed.
  • Further, to be readmitted in the proper grade level, the student must have completed appropriate credits for that grade level missed while on suspension.
  • Students who are on academic probation will not be eligible for cocurricular activities. Exceptions to this policy may be made for any student with a documented learning or emotional disability.

HS Index | Previous page: Plagiarism | Next page: Public displays of affection


Google Classroom[edit]

Google Classroom is a classroom web interface provided by Google for Education. This allows the teachers to interact with the students through announcements, assignments and other online interaction allowing for easier communication, distribution of work and collaboration. The use of this platform is encouraged throughout the secondary courses to create educational opportunities and online interactivity.

Final Assignment Deadlines[edit]

At the end of each semester a date approximately one week before the last day of the semester is designated as the final assignment deadline:

  • 1. No major assignments (anything other than regular daily assignments and quizzes) are to be due after (date ~one week before end of semester) except in semester length classes.
  • 2. No late work already more than five days late may be turned in after (date ~one week before end of the semester).
  • 3. No work for any class, even for new small assignments or assignments in semester length courses, can be turned in after (last day of the quarter).

Special circumstance exceptions can only be granted by the High School Principal.


HS Index | Previous page: Field trips and excursions | Next page: Food Allergy Policy


Homework, HS[edit]

CAJ Homework Philosophy[edit]

  • In general, CAJ believes homework should deepen and reinforce understanding and skill. It should provide independent practice, introduce new material, or provide enrichment and stimulate thinking. If homework is assigned as independent practice, it should be preceded by guided practice in class.
  • Homework assignments should be meaningful, reasonable, and well planned to encourage the “joy of learning,” never as punishment or as a substitute for teaching.
  • Students should know why the assignment is given, how and when they are to complete it, and how they will be held accountable.
  • Teachers should be sensitive to other demands placed on students and coordinate due dates for tests and other projects.
  • MS and HS teachers are required to post homework on the class calendars. See the principal or technology coordinator for more information.

High School Guidelines[edit]

  • High school is a time of learning independence and preparing for responsibilities beyond high school, both in academics and careers. We expect that homework expectations will intensify from middle school and gradually increase during students’ high school years. Our guidance curriculum will intentionally provide support and instruction for underclassmen to help them know, understand, and use effective time management and study skills.
  • We expect teachers to collaborate in monitoring dates of major assignments to help students manage their workload.
  • We respect that students have lives that involve more than academics and we want to encourage church involvement on Sundays, so generally we will not have major assignments or tests on Mondays or on the first day back from a vacation.
  • AP classes will require more time spent on homework and study. Students and parents sign an agreement indicating that they understand the additional time necessary for success when they enter an AP course.
  • Students who use their time well, plan ahead, minimize interruptions, and practice effective study strategies should not spend more than an average of 2 hours of homework in a night. When major projects, papers, and presentations are due, this amount may increase, though every effort will be made by teachers to not have multiple deadlines at the same time.

Late Work[edit]

Please also see the Late Work Policy


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Study hall[edit]

Study halls exist for studying (reviewing one’s agenda, planning and organizing, completing assignments, preparing for tests, doing research). Study hall supervisors may require all students to remain in the study hall room for quiet study for a designated period of time before allowing them to leave.

  • Once assignments and planning are completed, students may use study hall time to:
    • Read quietly
    • Take care of other school business (such as an appointment with the guidance counselor or registrar)
  • Study hall guidelines:
    • Students are expected to study. This means they may not be playing games or engaging in any other activities not directly connected to their education.
    • Study hall teachers will be checking for missing assignments, and additional restrictions will be placed on students who are missing an assignment in any class.
    • The study hall teacher may provide a pass (in the student’s Agenda) for students whose assignment requires them to work in the library, LRC, or computer lab.
    • Music students may take a music lesson or practice on a regular basis during their study hall time.
    • Arrangements should be made with the music department coordinator (Scott Ponzani, sponzani@caj.or.jp) who will provide names to the divisional principal to approve the absence from study hall.

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MLA Abbreviated Style Guide[edit]

“Why do I need to learn MLA style?” It is a question we sometimes hear at the Modern Language Association, and the answer is simple. Every time you write a research paper, you enter into a community of writers and scholars. The disciplines in this community all use conventions—think of the ways chemists, mathematicians, and philosophers use symbols and special terms to transmit information. MLA style represents a consensus among teachers, scholars, and librarians in the fields of language and literature on the conventions for documenting research, and those conventions will help you organize your research paper coherently. By using MLA style, you will direct your readers to the sources you consulted in arriving at your findings, and you will enable them to build on your work. (Gibaldi xiii)



MLA Abbreviated Style Guide (PDF)[edit]

MLA Video Modules[edit]

  1. Setting Paper Size
  2. Format Name Block
  3. Setting the Font
  4. Setting Setting Double Space
  5. Formatting Running Head

Formatting your Paper (see Gibaldi, pages 115 and following for examples)[edit]

  • Use 1 inch margins (or centimeter equivalent) on all sides (4.1)
  • Align document to the left margin (don’t center “justify” margins) (4.1)
  • Use 12 point serif font throughout the document (eg. Times New Roman) (4.2)
  • Begin your first page with the following heading in the upper left corner (4.3):
    • your name
    • your instructor’s name
    • class name
    • date (05 November 2011 or November 5, 2011)
  • Double space everything (4.2)
  • Number all pages consecutively throughout the paper in the upper right corner, using your last name and the page number (4.4)
  • Use italics to indicate titles of longer works (novels, textbooks) in your document and put “quotation marks” around titles of shorter works (poems, essays, articles) (3.6)
  • Do not make a title page unless specifically requested by your teacher (4.3)
  • Center the title one space below header (4.3)
  • For titles and names in foreign languages, see 3.1.4 and 3.3.2
  • For use and accuracy of quotations, see 3.7.1
  • For definitions of plagiarism, see chapter 2, p. 51 and following

In-Text Citations[edit]

  • Anything you quote or paraphrase or reference in the text must be included on the works cited list (5.3.1)
  • Generally, in-text citations contain the first item in the works cited entry, as well as the page number (5.3.1)
  • If you use the same author repeatedly, or if you reference the author’s name in your sentence, you may simply give the page numbers (3.6.6)
  • If you reference more than one work by the same author, include the first words of the title (ignoring articles “the” “a” or “an”) to distinguish between works
  • Direct quotes from the NIV Study Bible are followed by (New International Version, Gen. 1.1)
  • Indirect quotes from the NIV Study Bible are followed by (Gen. 1.1)

Quotations[edit]

  • For prose citation, see 3.7.2
  • For poetry citation, see 3.7.3
  • For drama citation, see 3.7.4
  • If the quotation ends your sentence, place the period after the citation (3.6.1).
  • “If the quotation runs more than four lines in your paper, set it off from your text by beginning a new line, indenting one inch. . . . from the left margin, and typing it double spaced, without adding quotation marks” (3.7.2).

Formatting your Works Cited List (see Gibaldi, pages 123 and following for examples)[edit]

  • Begin on a new page; continue page numbers from the text of the paper (5.3.2)
  • Title the list Works Cited, centered at the top of the page (5.3.2)
  • Double-space all entries. Do not skip lines between entries (5.3.3)
  • Alphabetize all entries (5.3.3)
  • Use a ½ inch hanging indent on the second and third lines of an entry (5.3.2)

Common Citation Forms[edit]

NIV Study Bible
NIV Study Bible. Ed. Kenneth Barker. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2002. Print.

A Book

Henley, Patricia. The Hummingbird House. Denver: MacMurray, 1999. Print.

Two books by the same author

(After the first listing of the author's name, use three hyphens and a period for the author's name. List books alphabetically)
Palmer, William J. Dickens and New Historicism. New York: St. Martin's, 1997. Print.
---. The Films of the Eighties: A Social History. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1993. Print.

Book with more than one author

Gillespie, Paula, and Neal Lerner. The Allyn and Bacon Guide to Peer Tutoring. Boston: Allyn, 2000. Print.

Book with a corporate author

American Allergy Association. Allergies in Children. New York: Random, 1998. Print.

Book or article with no author named

(Start the entry with the title of the article or book)
Encyclopaedia of Indiana. New York: Somerset, 1993. Print.
"Cigarette Sales Fall 30% as California Tax Rises." New York Times 14 Sept. 1999: A17. Print.

Anthology or Compilation

Shell, Marc, ed. American Babel: Literatures of the United States from Abnaki to Zuni. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2002. Print.

A part of a book (such as an essay in a collection)

Allende, Isabel. “Toad’s Mouth.” Trans. Margaret Sayers Peden. A Hammock beneath the Mangoes: Stories from Latin America,. Ed. Thomas Chochie. New York: Plume, 1992. 83 - 88. Print.

Article from a reference book

"Jamaica." Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1999 ed. Print

Magazine or newspaper article

Poniewozik, James. "TV Makes a Too-Close Call." Time 20 Nov. 2000: 70-71. Print.

Web site example

Felluga, Dino. Undergraduate Guide to Literary Theory. Purdue University, 17 Dec. 1999. Web. 15 Nov. 2000.
(Add URL at the end if required <http://website.com>)

Article on a web site example

Poland, Dave. "The Hot Button." Roughcut. Turner Network Television, 26 Oct. 1998. Web. 28 Oct. 1998.

Online journal article example

Wheelis, Mark. "Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention." Emerging Infectious Diseases 6.6 (2000):33 pars. Web. 5 Dec. 2000.

E-mail example

Kunka, Andrew. "Re: Modernist Literature." Message to Daniel J. Cahill. 15 Nov. 2000. E-mail.

Interview that you conducted

Purdue, Pete. Personal Interview. 1 Dec. 2000.

Sound recording

U2. All That You Can't Leave Behind. Interscope, 2000. CD.

Film

The Usual Suspects. Dir. Bryan Singer. Perf. Kevin Spacey, Gabriel Byrne, Chazz Palminteri, Stephen Baldwin, and Benecio del Toro. Polygram, 1995. Film.

<c>Works Cited</c>

Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. Seventh Edition. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009.


School Without Walls (SWOW)[edit]

  • High School School Without Walls (SWOW) occurs during a week in the fall, typically tied to Fall Break.
  • The 9-11 program focuses on leadership training while the 12th grade (as part of their Japanese Culture class) travels to Nagasaki.
  • No regular classes occur for the 5 days set aside for SWOW.
  • Currently:
    • Grade 9 does on-campus leadership and teamwork intiatives.
    • Grade 10 travels to Lake Yamanaka for advanced leadership and teamwork training.
    • Grade 11 experiences

      Wilderness Camp

, a multi-night backpacking outing wich focuses on leadership training and self-exploration.

    • Grade 12 takes a trip to learn and experience Japanese history and culture and Christianity in Japan.



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Student-led conferences[edit]

Student-led conferences (SLC's) are an important tool for helping students to articulate learning objectives and progress. SLC’s are held on campus in February and are the culmination of a number of strategies employed at school to help students become aware of the learning process and to take responsibility for their own learning. Students are asked to actively participate in the process and to make the most of a valuable learning opportunity. CAJ also sponsors MS parent-teacher conferences & HS parent-student-teacher Conferences.


Senior Comprehensives[edit]

Definition[edit]

Senior comprehensives, a year-long culminating event that is fully integrated into senior classes (Bible, English, social studies), requires seniors to select an issue, analyze it, apply a Biblical perspective to it, and generate an action plan for it that is personal, Biblical, and viable.

Prompts[edit]

Senior Comprehensives Prompts

Assessments[edit]

Senior comprehensives is based on 4 major tasks, each of which is assessed by a panel using a rubric and worth 25% of the final mark:

  1. Research Portfolio (rubric): Establish a scholarly research base for the issue consisting of an annotated bibliography, bibliography, and interview.
  2. Project and Summary (rubric): Complete a research-based, hands-on project that addresses the issue, demonstrates personal involvement, shows resourcefulness, and engages the community. Write a summary of the project.
  3. Synthesis Paper (rubric): Propose an action plan that effectively addresses the issue.
  4. Issue Action Presentation (rubric): Analyze an issue and current global/local* solutions to it, evaluate the issue and solutions using a Biblical perspective, and provide a personal, Biblical, viable action plan regarding the issue.
  • Global/local: meaning, at multiple levels, for example, school, community, city, region, NGO, country/government, world region, world/UN

Timeline[edit]

Project Examples[edit]

Senior Shepherds[edit]

Transcript Notations[edit]

The following is the wording that will be included on your permanent transcript. Each transcript will state:[edit]

The comprehensives at Christian Academy in Japan are designed to showcase a student’s talents, skills and applied efforts during a culminating event in their senior year. In a process that relies on both cooperation with the teaching staff and on independent work and problem solving, students engage an issue of their choosing as they think deeply about, and interact with, the problems of a fallen world. There are four elements assessed which are weighted equally for the final designation: Research, Writing, Project and Presentation.

Next, your rating (and only your rating, not the other levels) will be added. You will receive 1 of the following 5 ratings:[edit]

  • (Name of this student) achieved an overall rating of: Exemplary achievement An exemplary rating in this rigorous process requires exceptional work in all of the comprehensive elements and only a few students attain this highest level of achievement.
  • (Name of this student) achieved an overall rating of: Exceeds standard An exceeds standard rating in this rigorous process is a significant accomplishment and is only attained by those who achieve high marks in multiple areas of the comprehensives.
  • (Name of this student) achieved an overall rating of: Meeting the standard Meeting the standard in this rigorous process is a notable and worthy accomplishment and indicates success across all or most of the elements.
  • (Name of this student) achieved an overall rating of: Some Achievement
  • (Name of this student) achieved an overall rating of: Little Achievement

Frequently Asked Questions[edit]

1. Will I graduate if I do not do well on my comps?[edit]

Yes. A poor performance will be reflected on your transcript, but it will not keep you from graduating. (Keep in mind that most of the assignments for senior comprehensives will count for a grade in a given class; the Issue Action Paper and the Issue Action Presentation will not count for a grade in a given class.)

2. Will I graduate if I do not complete my comps?[edit]

No. You will receive an incomplete and not receive a diploma until you complete your senior comprehensives to an acceptable level that reflects reasonable effort.

3. Do I have to rewrite all the papers in my writing portfolio?[edit]

No. You may submit the papers you previously submitted, although you may certainly make changes if you are able to. If you are short of time, and have to make compromises, invest your energy in the Synthesis Paper and not rewrites of previous papers.

4. Can I cut and paste my papers throughout the year into my formal paper?[edit]

You may certainly use content from other papers, some of it word for word, but the purpose of the final paper is to synthesize what you have learned from various assignments into one formal paper.

5. Who is eligible to be on the panel for the presentation?[edit]

CAJ staff members who have a degree in education, are certified to teach, or have experience in teaching.


HS Index | Previous page: School Without Walls (SWOW) | Next page: Senior privileges


Honor Roll[edit]

At the end of each semester, a student’s grade point average (GPA) is used to determine the Honor Roll. Half-credit courses are counted at half value. Students with “incomplete” on their report cards are not listed until a grade is assigned. To be on the Honor Roll a student must have a rounded GPA of 3.6 or more for the semester. This is published on individual student transcripts. See also: Merit Roll.


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Merit Roll[edit]

At the end of each semester, a student’s grade point average (GPA) is used to determine the Merit Roll. Half-credit courses are counted at half value. Students with “incomplete” on their report cards are not listed until a grade is assigned. To be on the Merit Roll a student must have a rounded GPA that is 3.3 or more, and less than 3.6, for the semester. This is published on individual student transcripts. See also: Honor Roll.


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Awards, High School[edit]

CAJ desires to develop the unique gifts and talents of each student.

  • As part of this process, we present a wide variety of awards to recognize and encourage the use of these talents.
  • These awards are presented on a variety of occasions throughout the year, including at graduation and during assemblies.
  • The following is a listing of significant awards presented to students in CAJ’s high school. In an attempt to be as equitable as possible, every effort is made to maintain a consistent selection process with numerous checks and balances including final validation by the Leadership Team for all awards. A decision not to present specific awards may be made in any given year based on the candidates available. Family members of students who are eligible for the awards are disqualified from participation in the selection process. When students share an award, the monetary amount is split among them.

Alvey Leadership Scholarship[edit]

  • This award was created in honor of a godly businessman and to honor high school seniors who exhibit similar characteristics in leadership. When Mr. Alvey was asked what leadership trait he thought was most important, he stated, "Humility."
  • Awarded to a senior who has consistently demonstrated the highest degree of leadership qualities over his/her high school career. Humble leadership is one of the defining traits that qualify an individual for this award. Awarded to a student who effectively uses her/his gifts to provide leadership in (and outside when applicable) of the CAJ community.
  • Nomination forms (including a description of the qualifications) are distributed by the HS principal to all seniors and staff. These nominations should include a reason for the nomination. The HS principal will convene a panel of teachers and administrators who will review the nominations and select one candidate and an alternate. Final selections will be approved by the Leadership Team.
  • Award is announced at graduation and includes a monetary gift of ¥100,000 provided by an anonymous donor.

Athlete of the Year Award (Female/Male)[edit]

  • Given to a male and female student who are voted by the coaches as the outstanding athletes of the year.
  • Students are eligible who were in at least 2 sports and who were all-stars, MVPs, or triple varsity letter winners. The athletic coordinator compiles a ballot of athletes who have: 1) lettered in 3 sports, 2) lettered in 2 sports and have received recognition as MVP, league all-star or Far East tournament all-star or equivalent.
  • Chosen by the Athletic Department; all high school coaches receive the ballot of compiled eligible athletes and are requested to list their top 3 choices in order (1st choice gets 3 points, 2nd choice gets 2 points., 3rd choice gets 1 point). Ballots are returned to somebody outside the Athletic Department to tally. After Leadership Team validation, the athletic coordinator prepares the award, which is then presented at the end of the year and includes an engraved plaque.

CAJ Honor Award[edit]

  • This award is the highest honor presented to an individual by the school and was first awarded in 1956 on June 13th at the first commencement of CAJ.
  • The award is presented to one member of the senior class who is respected as a leader and outstanding role model of what CAJ desires its students to become spiritually, academically, and socially. "This award is given annually for the senior student who in the estimation of the high school faculty and student body has exerted the best influence in the school throughout the entire academic year. Some qualities that are exemplified and looked for may be: interest in helping others, attitudes of genuine friendliness, a daily lifestyle which brings honor to the Lord, and faithfulness" (excerpt from Christian Academy in Japan 1950-1994 written by June Habbestad, New Life League, Tokyo, Japan, May 1994).
  • Nomination forms (including a description of the qualifications) are distributed by the HS principal to all seniors and staff. These nominations should include a reason for the nomination. The HS principal will convene a panel of teachers and administrators who will review the nominations and select one candidate and an alternate. Final selections will be approved by the Leadership Team.
  • The recipient is announced at graduation and will receive a monetary gift of ¥200,000, a gold medal with the school seal, and recognition on a plaque at CAJ.

Christian Discipleship Award[edit]

  • This award is presented to a student who has demonstrated and expressed a vital relationship with Jesus Christ, and who has been involved in discipling others within CAJ or the wider community, encouraging them in their faith journey and helping them move from where they are, toward where God desires them to be.
  • The recipient is recognized as a man or woman of God who has a heart for positively contributing to the lives of others.
  • The recipient should reflect the principles expressed in 1 Corinthians 10:31-11:1 “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God. Do not cause anyone to stumble, whether Jews, Greeks or the church of God – even as I try to please everyone in every way. For I am not seeking my own good but the good of many, so that they may be saved. Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ”.
  • Nomination forms (including a description of the qualifications) are distributed by the HS principal to all seniors and made available to staff and selected community youth leaders. Nominations should include reasons for the nomination. Students can nominate others and are also welcome to self-nominate given their work could potentially not be known by peers or staff. A recommendation form from an adult overseer of the nominee’s core discipling involvement will then be sought from the nominee if they wish to be considered. The HS principal will convene a panel of teachers and administrators that will review the nominations and select one candidate and an alternate. The donor (or selected representative) will be advised of selections, with final approval then to be granted by the Leadership Team.
  • Award is announced at graduation and includes a monetary gift of ¥50,000, provided by Ron and Carolyn Hardy.

EARCOS Global Citizenship Award[edit]

  • The award is presented by the East Asia Regional Council of Overseas Schools (EARCOS) which is an organization of 100 member schools in East Asia.
  • This award is presented to a student who is conversant in at least two languages and who embraces the qualities of a global citizen. He/she is a proud representative of his/her nation while respectful of the diversity of other nations, has an open mind, is well informed, aware and empathetic, concerned and caring for others encouraging a sense of community and strongly committed to engagement and action to make the world a better place. The student is also able to interact and communicate effectively with people from all walks of life while having a sense of collective responsibility for all who inhabit the globe (excerpt from www.earcos.org). A heart for volunteerism and service are qualifications for this award.
  • Nominations are solicited from the high school staff, and a candidate is selected by a panel and validated by the Leadership Team. EARCOS will provide an engraved plaque with the student's name, which is presented at the high school spring concert.

Fitzgerald Career Athletic Awards[edit]

  • This award, instituted in 2001, recognizes one senior male athlete and one senior female athlete for the participation and positive impact that they have had on CAJ's athletic program. Previously called the Career Athletic Award, it was renamed in honor of the contribution to sports excellence made by Gene Fitzgerald, CAJ’s athletic director from 1966 to 1973 during the run of consecutive Far East basketball championships.
  • The recipients will have demonstrated excellence in their achievements in sports. They will be recognized for their consistent level of leadership as an athlete and for their quality contributions to CAJ athletics for their four years of high school. The recipients must earn at least four varsity letters in a single sport, or three varsity letters in their senior year, or an Athlete of the Year ballot, or four varsity letters overall.
  • The athletic coordinator compiles a list of all seniors who are eligible and uses a point system for the above requirements to determine the top three candidates (three female, three male) according to points. The athletic coordinator and high school principal select final candidates from the top three and present those names to the Leadership Team for validation.
  • The recipients (male and female) are presented a monetary award of ¥100,000.

Frederic Chopin Piano Award[edit]

  • The recipient for this award is selected by the Music Department for outstanding achievement in piano. The award is in honor of the great pianist and composer Frederic Chopin (1810-1849). "No great composer has devoted himself as exclusively to the piano as Chopin... Chopin is admired above all for his great originality in exploiting the piano. While his own playing style was famous for its subtlety and restraint, its exquisite delicacy in contrast with the spectacular feats of pianism then reigning in Paris, most of his works have a simple texture of accompanied melody. From this he derived endless variety, using wide-compass broken chords, the sustaining pedal and a combination of highly expressive melodies, some in inner voices" (excerpt from The Grove Concise Dictionary of Music).
  • The criteria for this award include outstanding ability and achievement as a pianist, contributions to the school music program, and demonstration of a cooperative spirit.
  • The recipient is awarded a certificate and pin at the high school spring concert and has his/her name engraved on a school plaque.

Fritz Kreisler Award for Strings[edit]

  • This award began in 1996 as a way to recognize exceptionally strong string players who also exhibit an attitude of servanthood.
  • The recipient must have a good technical background as well as a good tone production and musical phrasing ability and so be a worthy follower of Fritz Kreisler. The student should also exhibit servanthood by helping other students and teachers whenever necessary. Awards are only presented in years where there is an exceptional candidate. The awards are validated by the HS principal and the Leadership Team.
  • A certificate is presented at the final orchestra concert of the year.

Graduation Speaker (Adult)[edit]

  • The high school principal solicits nominations from the senior class. A list of candidates is validated by the Leadership Team, and the individual nominees are contacted to see if they are able to accept this honor that year and perform all the duties attached to it. The final list of eligible and willing candidates is presented to the senior class for a vote. Seniors select a first and second choice. After the results are tabulated, the high school principal contacts the students and the newly elected speaker with the results. The speaker is required to present a typed transcript of her or his speech well in advance of graduation (at least one week, two weeks preferred). If the high school principal is nominated, the votes will be tabulated by a third party.

Graduation Speaker (Student)[edit]

  • The class speaker is chosen by the senior class from members of the senior council. The speaker is required to present a typed transcript of her or his speech well in advance of graduation (at least one week, two weeks preferred).

Howard Blair Award[edit]

  • This award is given each year to one or two seniors who have demonstrated talent and dedication and excellence in literature.
  • This award was instituted when Howard Blair retired. Howard Blair was active as a teacher of English at CAJ for many years. "This award was first offered in 1981, when Mr. Blair left the classroom after 27 years of teaching English, Bible, and Latin at CAJ. He then became fully involved in the ministry of church growth in the Kurume Christ Church, where he had worked for many years" (excerpt from Christian Academy in Japan 1950-1994 written by June Habbestad, New Life League, Tokyo, Japan, May 1994).
  • This award is presented to a senior who is judged to have demonstrated academic excellence in English (especially in writing), including creativity and originality, and service to school and community. It is awarded to a senior who has consistently demonstrated talent, dedication, and excellence in the study of literature and who has maintained a high standard of communication in writing and speaking. The student is remarkable for developing skills and for presentation abilities. It comes with the stipulation that the student express a desire to continue to use his or her gifts in the area of communications and/or in the study of literature. It does not require that the winner plan to pursue a profession or even a major in literature, but the student should be able to articulate a vision for using communicative gifts and skills for the good of the community and as a means of personal expression, ministry, or service.
  • Given to one or two seniors for excellence in English. Nominated students are asked to complete an application, recipients are chosen by the English Department, and the recipients are validated by the Leadership Team.
  • The recipient receives a monetary gift of ¥100,000 which is presented at graduation.

Joan Johnston Senior Comprehensive Awards[edit]

  • Funded by an alumni of CAJ, Dr. Curtis Johnston, and his wife, Tami, the Joan Johnston Senior Comprehensive Awards honor Joan’s lifetime of service, many years of which have been dedicated to the care, instruction, and nurturing of CAJ students, staff, and parents. Joan’s life exemplifies what we desire to train our students to do: serve Japan and the world for Christ. Something Joan has done one class, one student, one conversation, sometimes one cookie, at a time.
  • These awards honor Joan’s lifetime of service, many years of which were dedicated to the care and nurturing of CAJ students, staff and parents. Joan’s life exemplified what we desire to train our students to do: serve Japan and the world for Christ. This was something she did one class, one student, one conversation, some-times one cookie, at a time. The awards are presented to seniors who have engaged in the senior comprehensive process in a manner that has made a lasting impact on their lives and the world around them. These awards are not necessarily selected based on the highest marks but by the passion and manner in which the students seek practical solutions to a significant problem.
  • The senior comprehensive advisors select candidates, and the recipients are validated by the Leadership Team.
  • Five awards of ¥20,000 each are presented at graduation.

John Philip Sousa Award for Band[edit]

  • The recipient of this award is chosen by the Music Department for outstanding achievement in instrumental music.
  • "The John Philip Sousa Award was first introduced in 1955 to honor outstanding dedication and superior musicianship in a high school band. It was created with the cooperation of Helen Sousa Albert and Priscilla Sousa, daughters of the famous composer and bandmaster, and has become the pinnacle of achievement for band students" (excerpt from p.2 of Student Music Awards, The Instrumentalist Publishing Company 2005). The award was instituted at CAJ in 1972 under the direction of Terry Clark, band director at the time.
  • This award goes to a senior in band who displays “outstanding achievement and interest in instrumental music, for singular merit in loyalty and cooperation, and for displaying those high qualities that high school instrumental music requires.”
  • Generally, just one award is given and is only presented in years when there are outstanding candidates. However, in the case of a tie, two awards can be given. The recipient can be in either band five days a week or in band and choir. Nominations are reviewed by the Music Department and a recipient is validated by the Leadership Team.
  • The recipient receives a certificate and a pin before the final band concert of the year.

Judy Amos Distinguished Service Award[edit]

  • This award is presented to a senior in recognition of outstanding service to the school and community. A life of service sets her or him apart.
  • This award was established in June 2005 to honor Judy Amos who began working at CAJ in 1968. She worked as a part-time teacher, board member, board secretary, board vice-chair, and board chair up until June 2005. "She is gracious, dedicated, self-sacrificing and unswervingly devoted to the purpose and principles on which this school is founded" (excerpt from Calvin Johnston's dedication script from the 2005 graduation).
  • Nomination forms (including a description of the qualifications) are distributed by the HS principal to all seniors and staff. These nominations should include a reason for the nomination. The HS principal will convene a panel of teachers and administrators who will review the nominations and select one candidate and an alternate. Final selections will be approved by the Leadership Team.
  • The recipient receives a monetary gift of ¥100,000 at graduation.

Habbestad Fine Arts Award[edit]

  • The award was first offered in 1994, when June Habbestad was to retire after 37 years, and is in recognition of her many years as CAJ's Fine Arts Coordinator, Drama Coordinator and director of many plays.
  • The award is given to one or two graduating students who has/have made an outstanding contribution in the Fine Arts (drama, speech, music, and the visual arts, including video). Students are nominated by staff and other high school students.
  • Students must demonstrate depth of dedication to one particular area or a breadth of involvement in several.
  • The award does not require that the winner pursue a profession or a major in the arts, but the student should be able to articulate a vision for using artistic gifts and skills for the good of the community and as a means of personal expression, ministry or service.
  • The nominees are required to fill out an application on which they will list fine arts activities they have been involved in at CAJ, any awards they've received in a fine arts area anywhere, and compose a short answer on the role arts will play in their future.
  • The committee, made up of three teaching staff members, one junior girl, and one junior boy, reviews the applications and makes a final decision, which is validated by the Leadership Team.
  • Recipients recieve a monetary gift of ¥100,000 at graduation.

Kidron Valley Scholastic Excellence Award[edit]

  • This award, first given in 2006, honors dedicated missionary work done specifically here in Japan.
  • The Kidron Valley Award is funded by a donor who desires to assist missionary kids, or MKs, with the costs of going to college. This is the only award we present that is restricted to MKs and is given to the MK with the highest GPA after the Essenburg awards are determined.
  • The high school principal, in cooperation with the registrar, presents a candidate and documentation to the Leadership Team for validation.
  • The recipient receives a monetary gift of ¥100,000 at graduation.

Knights Roll of Honor[edit]

  • Each year, CAJ recognizes outstanding academic achievement with this award for all senior students who have been on the honor roll for his or her entire high school career. This award is primarily based on the first 7 semesters but does include projected information from the final semester as well. If students were missing from CAJ for a semester or a year, then a comparable situation is determined from the other school when possible. If a student missed the honor roll one semester an exception may be made depending on the circumstances and the overall GPA.
  • The high school principal, in cooperation with the registrar, presents all candidates and documents to the Leadership Team for validation.
  • Seniors on the Knights Roll of Honor will be recognized at the graduation ceremony.

Les Johnston Biblical Perspective Award[edit]

  • This award is presented to a student who has shown exceptional ability to apply a biblical perspective across disciplines and issues. This student will not only have mastered the academic skills involved, but also have made a personal commitment to embracing a Christian worldview.
  • Funded by an alumni of CAJ, Dr. Curtis Johnston, and his wife, Tami, the Les Johnston Biblical Perspective Award honors Les's many years of dedicated service to the mission field in Japan and to Christian Academy in Japan.
  • Nomination forms (including a description of the qualifications) are distributed by the HS principal to all seniors and staff. These nominations should include a reason for the nomination. The HS principal will convene a panel of teachers and administrators that will review the nominations and select one candidate and an alternate. Final selections will be approved by the Leadership Team.
  • Award is announced at graduation and includes a monetary gift of ¥100,000.

Louis B. Armstrong Award for Jazz[edit]

This award is presented to a student for recognition of outstanding musicianship in the area of jazz music.

  • "Louis Armstrong was the epitome of jazz as a trumpeter, a singer, and a band leader. His imaginative, simple style led the way for others and changed the course of jazz. His phenomenal skill dazzled audiences around the world. Lucille Armstrong, his wife in later years, described his love for people. "Louis's greatest personality traits were humility and generosity... He just loved people, and he always tried to understand them too... He was compassionate, generous, and understanding with everyone... He was loved, not only for his style, but as a person as well." The Louis Armstrong Jazz Award was introduced in 1974 with the approval of his widow, Lucille Armstrong, to honor outstanding jazz students" (taken from p.6 of Student Music Award, The Instrumentalist Publishing Company 2005).
  • For outstanding achievement by an instrumentalist in the field of jazz, as demonstrated through superior musicianship and individual creativity. This award will be presented to a senior who has demonstrated “outstanding achievements in the field of jazz as demonstrated through superior musicianship, character and individual creativity.” Other factors include attitude, punctuality, dependability, and a willingness to learn.
  • Nominations are reviewed by the Music Department faculty, and a candidate is presented to the Leadership Team for validation. Generally, just one award is given. However, in the case of a tie, two awards can be given. The recipient must be a member of Jazz Band.
  • The student receives a certificate and a pin at the Spring Parade of Bands concert and has their name engraved on the school plaque.

Martin Essenburg Academic Achievement Award[edit]

  • This award is presented to recognize outstanding academic achievement (specifically honoring the valedictorian and salutatorian).
  • From the early days of CAJ's history, Martin Essenburg had a significant impact on the school, notably in the pursuit of academic excellence. His influence, over sixteen years of faithful service, is honored in two awards, one for the valedictorian and one for the salutatorian.
  • These awards are presented to seniors who have shown consistent and sustained achievement in their grades throughout their CAJ high school career, graduating with the top two cumulative grade point averages in their class.
  • The high school principal, in cooperation with the registrar, presents two candidates to the Leadership Team for validation.
  • The recipients are honored at graduation and they each (valedictorian and salutatorian) receive a monetary award of ¥100,000.

Martie Tarter Choral Award[edit]

  • The Martie Tarter Choral Award was established to honor her long and significant contribution to the choral art at CAJ. The award is given in recognition of merit, ability and achievement as a singer and a leader, a high degree of dedication, loyalty and cooperation, and outstanding contributions to the success of the vocal music program.
  • The Director of Choral Activities in consultation with the Music Department faculty make the selection.
  • The recipients receive a certificate and have their names engraved on the school plaque.

National Honor Society[edit]

  • CAJ is an affiliate of the National Honor Society (NHS), a US organization which is sponsored by the National Association of Secondary School Principals. Members of NHS are students dedicated to scholarship, service, leadership, and high moral character.
  • High school students in grades 10, 11, and 12 are eligible for membership in the CAJ chapter of NHS by meeting the following criteria: cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above and sufficient participation in leadership, service, and community activities. After first semester grades have been posted, students who meet the grade point average criterion are invited to fill out a form (due in mid-April) enumerating their participation in various activities. A faculty council consisting of five high school teachers is convened in the fourth week of April by the NHS advisor to review the forms and recommend students for membership in NHS. The high school principal and NHS advisor are observers of the process and do not participate in the voting.
  • New inductees are notified by mail after the meeting of the faculty council and welcomed into NHS publicly during a chapel or assembly in mid-May. NHS members receive a certificate and their membership is noted on their transcript.

PTA Awards[edit]

  • These department-specific awards are presented to seniors for outstanding scholarship. Each award honors an especially capable senior who shows special promise in a given department.
  • All PTA awards are presented to students who exhibit:
    • A deep understanding and appreciation of the specific subject.
    • A mature proficiency in the use of the "tools" of the subject (writing, computing, discussing, reading, composing, creating).
    • The ability and willingness to contribute to the learning of others in the class through their own contributions to the subject (being helpful, asking challenging questions, sharing profound or thought-provoking insights and ideals).
    • The ability and/or potential to do useful independent study in the subject.
  • The process will be monitored by the HS principal. Department chairs ask for nominations from HS teachers in their department for seniors who they feel match the criteria. Teachers in the particular department who have not directly taught these students should abstain from the nomination/voting process, but are encouraged to be part of the discussion. Immediate family members of seniors should not participate in the selection process for any awards. Nominations are then discussed and voted on. A first selection and an alternate student is then submitted to the HS principal who may (1) return to the teachers for additional input and discussion or (2) present the department's choice to the Leadership Team for validation. Students are only eligible to win one department award. If no qualified candidate is available in a department that year, the award will not be presented. In some cases where the department is unable to select between two equally and highly qualified candidates, the award may be shared between the two. The PTA service award is presented to a student nominated and voted on by teachers and senior students.
  • Students are provided a monetary award by the PTA of ¥20,000 at graduation.
  • Awards are given for the following departments:
    • Art
    • Bible
    • Computer
    • English
    • World Language
    • Vocational Arts
    • Math
    • Music
    • Physical Education
    • Science
    • Service
    • Social Studies
  • Awards are not necessarily given each year.

Quincy Jones Musicianship Award[edit]

In his long musical career, Quincy Jones has done it all as a composer, arranger, performer, producer and teacher.  Every music program has a student who shares this boundless energy and musical versatility. Starting in SY 2012-2013, this is given to a student for contributions and creativity in multiple areas of music.

Samuel Public Speaking Scholarship[edit]

  • This award, instituted in 2005, is named after someone honored as a dynamic and exceptionally well-prepared preacher who was also a mentor for others. It should also be noted that the talents of the biblical Samuel included ministry, speaking, and teaching.
  • The recipient will be a student who effectively uses his/her speaking talents in multiple areas in the CAJ community (and off campus as appropriate). This award is given to the senior who has demonstrated the highest degree of competence in public speaking. This could be in the areas of speaking at the school chapel services, speaking at Hi-BA rallies, and competence on the school debate team, and might include other forms of expression.
  • Nomination forms (including a description of the qualifications) are distributed by the HS principal to all seniors and staff. These nominations should include a reason for the nomination. The HS principal will convene a panel of teachers and administrators who will review the nominations and select one candidate and an alternate. Final selections will be approved by the Leadership Team.
  • The recipient will receive a monetary award of ¥100,000 at graduation.

Senior Athletic Awards[edit]

  • The Senior Athletic Award is given to any senior athlete who has lettered four times in one sport or who has lettered in three sports during the senior year. Information regarding participation is compiled by the athletic coordinator; no voting is necessary for this award.

Senior Music Awards[edit]

  • The Senior Music Award was instituted in 2009 and is given to seniors who have made significant contributions to the music program through sustained enrollment in one or more performing groups over their high school careers.
  • The award requires enrollment in seven semesters of band or choir, or a minimum of three years in Jazz Band, orchestra, Chamber Singers or Handbell Ensemble and participation during senior year. Students who have been away for a maximum of one school year are still eligible if they have been enrolled in a similar organization or pursued lessons during that time. The Music Department Chair and Registrar compile the list of candidates for this award.
  • Students are presented with a certificate at the last concert of the school year.

Special Awards[edit]

  • Special awards selected by the Leadership Team are sometimes presented to individuals to honor specific contributions not recognized in other awards. Staff members may nominate individuals for these awards by contacting the high school principal. Awards are not presented every year.

HS Index | Previous page: Attendance | Next page: Back-to-School Day


Curriculum, HS[edit]

The Christian Academy in Japan offers its high school students a variety of courses. A complete description of the CAJ high school curriculum is available online in the Course Descriptions.


HS Index | Previous page: Courses: Repeating | Next page: Dances


Courses: Credits[edit]

Students earn 1 credit for each semester class. Yearlong courses (for example, math) are worth 2 credits. Unless transferring to a different school for unavoidable reasons, students who withdraw from classes before the end of the semester receive no credit. Exceptions may be granted by the head of school.


HS Index | Previous page: Courses: Correspondence | Next page: Courses: Independent


Course Descriptions[edit]

For general academic information, consult the CAJ High School Student Handbook

Typical basic schedules: see graduation requirements

  1. 9th: Bible and PE/Health, English, math, biology, language, World History, a fine art or other elective and study hall
  2. 10th: Bible and PE/Health, English: World Literature, language, math, comparative politics, science, study hall and 1 elective
  3. 11th: Bible and PE/Health, English: American Literature, American history, study hall and electives
  4. 12th: Bible and PE/Health, English: British Literature, Japanese Culture, Senior Capstone, study hall and electives.


Art[edit]

Art Design[edit]

2 semesters
This course allows for students to continue progressing in art skills and appreciation all year. The first semester focuses on each element as a unit with a choice of assignments to practice and apply the concepts of Art Theory. The second semester focuses on the principles of art through advanced projects that allow students to experiment with various techniques and mediums previously learned.

Ceramics[edit]

2 semesters
This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to explore ceramic media and processes. Students will learn basic skills in hand-building, working on the potter's wheel and creating a variety of surface designs. The course also includes a look at some of the scientific and cultural aspects of ceramics, and connections between creation and Creator.

Drawing and Painting[edit]

2 semesters
Drawing & Painting is an advanced art class, focusing on academic skills of drawing and painting. The first half is mainly drawing and the second half painting. It is a year class that targets students who plan an artistic career in future. There is flexibility in the projects that are chosen.

Art and Design, AP[edit]

2 semesters
The AP Art and Design course is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art. AP Art and Design students do not take a written AP exam, but will be responsible for submitting a portfolio of their work for evaluation in May. Students in this class work on producing and evaluating portfolios in the areas of Drawing, 2-D, or 3-D Design. Students whose portfolios receive a score of 3 or higher may earn college credit at participating universities.

Bible[edit]

Bible 9: Introduction to Christianity[edit]

1 semester
This course provides a framework for understanding Christianity. In addition to learning about what is in the Bible, we will ask broader questions about the overall story that Christians find in the Bible, where the Bible came from, and why and how Christians look to it for truth and guidance. This framework, when filled out by later classes in the CAJ Bible curriculum, will prepare students to succeed in their Bible-based integration of their Senior Comprehensives topic into the overall story that Christians find in the Bible.

Bible 10/11: Understanding the Gospels[edit]

0.5 semester
The purpose of this course is to equip you to read and understand the gospels, the four narratives about Jesus that begin the New Testament. We will explore questions like: Can the gospels be trusted? Why are there four of them? What kind of book is the Bible? Why were the gospels written? What is the “good news” they tell about? How do the gospels carry forward the story of the Old Testament? Why did the gospel writers choose to include the stories they included?


Bible 10/11: The Screwtape Letters[edit]

0.5 semester
The purpose of this course is to equip you to think about big questions about life and reality in conversation with Christian teaching, important literature, and your own experience. To do this, we will use C.S. Lewis’ fictional book The Screwtape Letters, a collection of short letters in which a senior demon (Screwtape) gives advice to a junior demon (Wormwood) about how best to tempt a particular human being (“the Patient”) away from God and into hell. Along the way, we will explore questions like: What’s the real difference between good and evil? What’s the world really like? How much can we control ourselves? How can we be truly free? How does having bodies affect how we experience and understand the world? What is God really up to? What do we really need in life, and where do we get it? What is true love?


Bible 10/11: Wisdom[edit]

0.5 semester
What does it mean to make wise choices in life, especially when we face difficult decisions or encounter confusing situations? For help in answering this relevant question, we will look to two of the Bible’s “Wisdom Books”: Proverbs and Ecclesiastes. We will focus on how Christ is the wisdom and power of God as we investigate the meaning of living well in God’s world — a world where we often encounter problems, temptations to foolishness, and even apparent meaninglessness.

Bible 10/11: Apologetics[edit]

0.5 semester
This course focuses on Christian apologetics—explaining how Christianity answers hard questions and is reconciled with our understanding of the way the world works. After beginning with a survey of what apologetics is, we will learn about how logical arguments work and then begin to look at hard questions that Christians have had to answer throughout history. Through individual and group work, we will learn how Christians understand the relationship between faith and reason, what some of the most important challenges to Christianity are, and how Christians should respond to these challenges, both from a logical and an interpersonal perspective.

Bible 10/11: World Religions[edit]

0.5 semester
As of 2016, over 80% of the world population self-identify as religious in some way. This means that a basic understanding of religion in general, and the world’s major religions specifically, is a necessity in understanding and impacting the world that we live in, and understanding and relating to others in the world. Through this course, students will learn basic facts, doctrine, and history of some of the major religions in the world. Rather than taking a strictly informational approach, however, this information will provide the backdrop for questions of Christian teaching and doctrine, addressing questions such as, Why are people religious? How do we explain similarities and differences between Christianity and other religions? What do Christians think will happen to those who follow other religions? Where (and how) do we draw the line between religious practices and cultural practices?


Bible 10/11: Bible and Film[edit]

0.5 semester
Why watch movies? Should Christians pay close attention to what movies have to say? What is the difference between watching a movie only to be entertained and “reading” a movie to understand, evaluate, and appreciate its view of life? These are some of the questions we will ask as we look to the Bible for guidance on how to enjoy a movie as a source of beauty and truth while also critiquing its vision of the world.


Bible 12: Ethics[edit]

1 semester
Bible 12 looks at Ethics, as well as playing a role in the Senior Comps process. Students learn what sets Christian ethics apart from secular ethical systems by studying 5 major ethical systems: Deontology, Utilitarianism, Ethical Egoism, Virtue Ethics, and Moral Relativism. Once this baseline for understandings about ethics has been laid, students learn about Christian ethics, and compare it to what they know of these 5 secular ethical systems. Students also debate the application of the 10 Commandments to see how they might be used to guide a Christian in understanding the appropriate Christian perspective on current issues.

Digital Technologies[edit]

Yearbook Journalism[edit]

2 Semesters
Students participate in an intense study in basic design, typographic principles, digital photographic editing, and caption writing, using professional software applications used in magazine layout production. Students must be self-motivated.

Computers and Computer Programming[edit]

2 semesters, availability based on demand
Students learn database design, computer hardware, networking and programming. In the database design unit, students use FileMaker Pro and MySQL to design databases. Students study the interoperation of the operating system and hardware in the hardware unit. In the Networking unit students study how data moves from computer to computer and how that data is interpreted by the computer. Students study procedural and object-oriented programming and work on individual projects.

English[edit]

English 9[edit]

2 semesters
An introduction to world literature ranging in scope from ancient epics to contemporary novels. Students interpret, evaluate, and respond to literature as they wrestle with perennial questions about truth, identity, justice, and stewardship. Within each unit, an emphasis is made in developing reading, writing, and presentation skills. Students discuss literary texts, compose analytical and narrative essays, study grammar and vocabulary, and give both formal and creative presentations.

English 10[edit]

2 semesters
A survey of world literature emphasizing voices from countries other than the US and Great Britain and how people from many cultures have wrestled with the following significant questions: “Who am I?”, “Who is my neighbor?”, “What is wrong with the world?”, and “What is the significance of words?”. Special effort is made to incorporate works from every country represented in the class. Units incorporate composition, vocabulary, and literary analysis. Students will complete an independent study of grammar, give presentations, write in journals, analyze and respond to literature, take tests and quizzes, and write a research-based worldview perspective paper.

Humanities 11[edit]

2 semesters, 2 periods, English and US History credits.
A thematic survey of American history and literature, covering themes such as American identity, foreign policy, voting and minority rights, economics and stewardship, technology and civil rights. Students will learn how literature reflects and affects historical developments in a thematic progression, especially as it concerns the nature of the American dream and the "hyphen-American" experience. Students will give presentations, study and use rhetoric, write both analytical and creative pieces, research and compose a secondary source author paper and participate in online and in class discussions.

AP English Language component: students may choose to participate in the additional work of preparing for the AP Language test, working through essays of synthesis, rhetorical analysis and argumentation, as well as reading strategies for fiction and non-fiction materials and evaluating prose and poetry for rhetorical effect. This preparation requires at least two additional hours of homework per week.

Prerequisite: successful application to take the AP class.

English 12[edit]

2 semesters
A question driven study of European culture from the medieval to the postmodern, focusing on British literature, seeking to understand man's search for meaning through a foundation of good and a struggle through evil and suffering. Students will read, write, think, research and speak in order to reflect, evaluate and synthesize their learning. The course is organized by units, each of which is comprised of a major polished paper, several timed essays, novel, short story and poetry reading, as well as a major presentation and a literary terms test.

AP English Literature: In addition to the above curriculum, students will work through AP reading lists, write essays of poetry and prose analysis and open literary critique, as well as evaluating poetry and prose reading in multiple choice questions. This preparation requires at least two additional hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: successful application to take the AP class.

Effective Reading and Writing[edit]

2 semesters, EAL class
The EAL classes in high school support students at each grade level to improve their academic English across the curriculum. Students are given opportunities to develop their grammar skills, build their academic vocabulary, improve their reading strategies, develop their writing, listening and thinking skills, and hone their presentation skills across the academic content subjects. Students’ English language foundation is strengthened while they are being supported in successfully completing the classroom assignments of these academic subjects.

Creative Arts[edit]

Culinary and Textile Arts[edit]

2 Semesters
This project based course is designed to expand on the cooking and sewing skills from the middle school curriculum. Students will have both individual and collaborative studies in a variety of skills including meal planning and preparation, budgeting, shopping, stewardship of resources, service/hospitality, sewing, knitting, crocheting, needlework and quilting. Discussion of how we honor God with these skills is woven throughout the course. Each student also completes an independent project with the approval of the teacher.

Design and Technology[edit]

2 semesters, subject to demand
How does stuff work? Electricity, wood, plastics, metals, programs--what kinds of things can be made by shaping, harnessing, and designing these? Students learn not just tools, machines, hardware and software, but also how to make good designs so that materials fit together and work together in order to function well. Then they take the next step--turning designs into reality! Through hands-on experiential learning and trial-and-error problem solving, students will have the opportunity to imagine, design, and create real-world objects of their choosing by woodworking, metalworking, 3D printing, and/or programming.

Mathematics[edit]

Science and Mathematics Course Advice

Algebra 1[edit]

2 semesters
A basic course in first level algebra. Topics studied include open sentences, systems of equations, graphing of linear functions, polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents, radicals, quadratic conditions, absolute values, and practical applications. A graphing calculator is required. Entry skills / Prerequisite: Basic math, including addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, as well as, fractions, percents, decimals, whole numbers and ratios, and successful completion of a Pre-Algebra course recommended

Algebra 2[edit]

2 Semesters
This is an advanced algebra course which includes number systems, review of linear sentences, polynomials, rational expressions; systems of sentences, introduction to functions, coordinate geometry, exponents; logarithms, trigonometry, conic sections; graphing calculator; and some theory of equations, sequences, probability, and statistics.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Successful completion of a year of Geometry and Algebra 1.

Applied Mathematics[edit]

2 semesters
This is a high school standard course that develops mathematical applications to situations in everyday life. The course reviews numbers, arithmetic, and spreadsheets, explores financial mathematics, data and statistics, measurements, living spaces and project management. Fundamental skills are practiced regularly. Students are encouraged to consider questions like: How does mathematics help us to understand God's nature? How can we serve others with mathematics? How can mathematics help us find the truth? Essential Skills: Middle School mathematics.

Geometry[edit]

2 Semesters
Geometry is the study of visual patterns. In this course mathematical observation skills are sharpened by recognizing and analyzing these patterns as they relate to the shape and size of objects, both physical and theoretical. This course also includes an introduction to logic and proofs. The student will continue to learn more about two and three-dimensional shapes build on their algebraic base. Mathematical thinking is rigorous and different from much of the thinking used in our everyday lives. Problem solving and logical thinking skills will be strengthened by this class.
Entry skills / Prerequisites: Algebra 1

Precalculus[edit]

2 semesters
Pre-calculus covers functions and graphs including polynomial, power and rational functions; Exponential, logistic and logarithmic functions; Trigonometric functions and identities; Discrete mathematics including sequences and probabilities. This course prepares students for Calculus.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Algebra 2

Calculus AB, AP[edit]

2 semesters
This course prepares students for the AP Calculus exam in the spring. The study focuses on properties of functions: continuity, limits, differentiation and integration, volumes of solids of revolution. Students who complete the course satisfactorily should be adequately prepared to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.
Non-AP Calculus is a possibility. This is for students who take Calculus but opt not to take the AP exam. The topics of study are the same as AP Calculus, but the teacher may adjust the assignments accordingly. Entry skills / Prerequisite: Precalculus

Calculus BC, AP[edit]

2 semesters, Advanced Placement course.
A second year Calculus AP course. In addition to the AB requirement also covers topics like partial fractions, integration by parts, Taylor and Maclaurin series and lengths of curves. Students who complete the course satisfactorily should be adequately prepared to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: completion of Calculus AB

Statistics[edit]

2 semesters, AP or non-AP, subject to demand.
AP: This is a college-level course that investigates the nature of data collection, techniques of data analysis, probability and inferential statistics. The course will prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Statistics exam, although this is not required. Students are encouraged to consider broader questions such as: How do we find the truth in this world? How can we serve others with mathematics? How can God's love of truth guide our research?
Non-AP: For students not planning to take the AP exam, most of the inferential statistics unit is not included, and more time is spent on consumer statistics instead.
Essential skills: Algebra 2, although current enrollment in Precalculus or Calculus is an advantage.

Music[edit]

High School Symphonic Band[edit]

2 semesters
In High School Symphonic Band, students rehearse and perform music of a high artistic level that is technically challenging and artistically rewarding for high school musicians. Two important skills are developing advanced technique necessary to perform such music, and refining intonation in unisons and intervals. Students frequently work collaboratively in small groups to refine the playing of their sections. Biblical concepts presented are: What does it mean that God made us to be creative? How are musicians are affected by the fall? How does Christ’s act of redemption affect our creativity? How do we restore the arts to be what God intended? High School Symphonic Band usually performs 3 or 4 concerts per year.

Jazz Ensemble[edit]

1 credit/year. Zero period
Jazz Ensemble is a class in which musicians come together to learn and play as a collaborative ensemble. Most of the time students will play as one whole unit (big band), but there will also be time and opportunities provided for students to work in smaller groups called combos. Learning jazz is like learning a new language, therefore listening is a critical component for all students. Weekly listening to jazz musicians is a requirement in this class and suggested artists are available for students who have no reference point for their instrument. Improvisation is what makes jazz what it is. Students will be taught a systematic approach to improvisation and soloing in class through theory and application. Students will have opportunities to practice soloing with both the whole ensemble and smaller combos. Students will learn how to effectively communicate in the language of jazz, be it through interpretation or improvisation, ultimately learning how God has created us in his image as creative beings.
Prerequisite Director’s approval

Choral: Concert Choir[edit]

2 semesters
This course seeks to encourage the development of a lifelong love of singing. Areas of study will include basic vocal technique, the development of music reading skills including sight singing, and the performance of music literature with both sacred and secular texts ranging from the Renaissance through contemporary styles. Though the choir is a group activity every effort will be made to encourage poise, confidence, and musical artistry in each individual singer. Performance opportunities include three on-campus concerts, and the KPASSP Choral Festival. Attendance at all performances is mandatory.

Choral: Chamber Singers[edit]

1 credit/year, Zero period
This course is designed for singers from the Concert Choir who desire a higher level of music, are independent learners, and are willing to spend time outside of the school day in rehearsal and performances. This course is one of the primary public ministry outreaches of Christian Academy in Japan. Literature includes sacred and secular music of the 16th to 21st centuries. Performance opportunities, at which attendance is required, include on-campus concerts, outreach concerts for local churches, morning worship services and festivals. Chamber Singers rehearse two mornings per week; rehearsals are before school (7:20 - 8:20 a.m.), and extra rehearsals may be called as needed. There is a ¥20,000 fee for this class. (Financial aid is available.) Open to students in 9th grade and above.
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Concert Choir is required. Auditions for this group occur in May for the following school year. Additional auditions may take place in the beginning of the school year.

Handbell Ensemble[edit]

1 credit/year. Zero period.
The CAJ Handbell Ensemble is one of the public ministry outreach groups of Christian Academy in Japan. The group rings five octaves of handbells and five and a half octaves of handchimes, sometimes includes other instruments (as needed and available), and occasionally utilizes student conductors. Ringing technique is taught in class, and musicianship is emphasized. Literature includes sacred and secular music written specifically for handbells, arrangements of hymns, praise songs, and other well-known songs, and transcriptions of classical pieces. Performance opportunities, at which attendance is required, include on-campus concerts, morning church services, and outreach concerts. The CAJ Handbell Ensemble rehearses two mornings per week before school (7:15 to 8:15 a.m.), and extra rehearsals may be scheduled as needed. No prior ringing experience is necessary. There is a ¥20,000 fee for this class. Concert attire is provided.
Prerequisites: Ability to read music (treble or bass staff or both) is required. Auditions are held in late May or early June for the following school year.

Orchestra: String Orchestra[edit]

1 credit/year. Zero period.
Course open to students in grades 6 through 12 who are currently studying a string instrument at an intermediate level equivalent to a grade 3 or above of the ABRSM or Trinity examinations. Students will study music from a variety of styles and genres in preparation for concert performance. Students receive practical experience in string ensemble and orchestral playing. Only string students may register for Orchestra. Rehearsals include sectionals, chamber music, small groups and larger ensemble. The course includes the development of listening skills, music theory, and opportunities for student leadership such as student teaching or student conducting. The Orchestra performs at school concerts and church or community events.
Prerequisite: Director’s approval

Digital Music Design[edit]

2 credits/year. Digital Music Design is for students that have an interest in making music, whether they have a traditional music background or not. Focused on personalized learning through project-based music creation, students are given a variety of songwriting and production challenges that teach how to express ideas musically, open students up to new-found creativity, and push students’ music-making abilities. Students will be using a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) called Ableton Live, and their dedicated hardware controller, Push. With these two primary tools, students will learn how to produce music in a variety of genres, develop practical songwriting tools, and collaborate with others in a digital music environment.


Concert Band/Concert Choir[edit]

2 credits/year.
This option is designed specifically for those students who would like to continue to develop both instrumental and vocal skills. These selected students will alternate between choir and band rehearsals, which will meet during the same period of the day. Students are expected to practice the material for both classes on their own time in addition to practice with the groups during the class period. Attendance at all performances, such as on-campus concerts and the KPASSP Choral festival, is mandatory.
Prerequisite: Band and choir directors’ approval at the beginning of the school year or at semester change.

Physical Education[edit]

PE/Health[edit]

(Required Course for 4 semesters of HS)
All students will be taking PE/Health each year they attend CAJ. In 9th grade the emphasis will be on physical fitness, the body systems, wellness, nutrition and first aid/CPR. In 10th and 11th grade a variety of lifetime sports and activities will be taught as well as an emphasis on mental and social health, substance abuse and sexuality. 12th grade will be a time to choose specific areas of sport interest and develop skills further as well as prepare for adult health issues and deepen health literacy.

Strength and Conditioning[edit]

1 or 2 semesters.
PE Elective. This course will give students the opportunity to know and understand the benefits of a well-planned strength and conditioning program, as well as be familiar with terminology, basic concepts of program design and basic physiology. Students will be able to prescribe and implement an appropriate program to improve total body strength, power, speed, agility and balance. They will be able to perform various exercises with good technique, and will demonstrate the ability to incorporate proper safety procedures into training activities.

Social Studies[edit]

World History 9[edit]

2 semesters
World History is a broad-reaching subject, but is essentially a study of people. This class will explore the ways in which people have changed over time, and the ways they've stayed the same. We'll examine what people believe, what they've done, and how our environment changes our behaviors. We will investigate many cultures, events, and conflicts in an attempt to discover the connections of the past to the present. Students will have a variety of ways to demonstrate their understanding through discussions, debates, projects, presentations, and collaboration.


Comparative Politics and Government[edit]

2 semesters; required course in grade 10
The purpose of this class is to obtain a general knowledge of how different types of governments work, how are they similar or dissimilar from each other in their operation and how people and governments respond to all kinds of issues. Students learn the roles of different levels of government and the responsibilities of citizens. After learning concepts, students look at case studies to see how these are played out in the real world, not only in theory or in an ideal sense, but in practice. Examples from around the globe include a variety of systems, and structures falling into four general categories: Multi-party systems, Two-party systems, Dominant party systems, and Single party systems.

Economics, AP[edit]

2 semesters, social studies elective, Advanced Placement course.
This course focuses on microeconomics in the first semester, and macroeconomics in the second semester. Students have the choice of taking the micro and/or macro AP tests. Economic principles are set in the context of contemporary society and current events. This is an exceptionally rigorous class as the demands for preparing for both tests demand the same pacing as a college semester course.
Non-AP option: Students may take the course without taking the AP exam and without the AP title.
Prerequisite: English 10.

Humanities 11[edit]

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Japanese Culture[edit]

1 semester, required grade 12 Social Studies.
This is a one semester senior course that provides a general foundation for students’ knowledge of various aspects of Japanese culture. The goal is to cultivate and enhance each student’s understanding and appreciation of Japan and its people and culture, particularly through case studies such as the influences of Confucian values on society, Nagasaki and the significance of Christianity and the Atomic Bomb. Students will also conduct a mini cultural lesson as a semester project on topics of their choice. In this course, students will consider such questions as “How did elements of geography, historical events, and religious beliefs contribute to the formation of Japanese culture as we see it today?”; “What are the foundational cultural values of the Japanese people?”; and “In what ways and to what degree are Christians living in Japan responsible for learning and understanding Japanese culture?”

Psychology[edit]

2 semesters, social studies elective.
An introduction to the field of psychology covering neuroscience, learning, memory, social norms, and other topics that vary with the interests of the students.
Prerequisite: English 10, and preferably two years of science courses.


Senior Capstone[edit]

1 Semester, grade 12 required course.
A survey of contemporary issues and governmental systems. Students will consider the following significant questions: “How should Christians use wealth and power?”, How should Christians apply truth and justice to complex situations?”, and “Why is it important for Christians to be aware of cultures and issues around us?” Students will participate in an Senior Comprehensives, participate in a Senior Ministry trip, and participate in a wide variety of group activities including debates and discussions.

Science[edit]

Science and Mathematics Course Advice

Biology[edit]

2 semesters, required grade 9 course.
This course covers topics of ecology, cell biology, and genetics; the five kingdom classification systems are studied ending with a look at God’s ultimate creation: humans. Students will consider the following significant questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us? What are some aspects of genetics that have an impact on society? How do the organ systems of our bodies work together? Students will write a genetics report, complete a body system project, and do a newspaper article review. Required freshman course.

Biology, AP[edit]

2 semesters. Subject to availability. Advanced Placement course.
AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course, and completing the course prepares students for the AP Biology exam. The course focuses on developing conceptual understanding of scientific principles and processes that relate to living organisms and systems using science practices. The course is designed to help students also develop inquiry and reasoning skills, be able to design a plan for collecting and analyze data, and connect concepts in and across domains.
Prerequisite: Biology

Chemistry[edit]

2 semesters
Chemistry is the study of the interaction of natural substances at the molecular and atomic level to produce many physical phenomena that humans observe in their daily lives. The course is designed to be as interactive, participative and motivational as possible. Students will be given ample opportunity to experiment and use chemical substances, and challenged to link experimental observations to theoretical facts.
Prerequisites: Biology, and Algebra II (concurrent).
Text: Chemistry Matter and Change (Glencoe McGraw-Hill), teacher supplied notes

Chemistry, AP[edit]

2 semesters, Advanced Placement course.
Subject to availability and demand. The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, in their first year, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses.
AP Chemistry strives to meet the objectives of a good college general chemistry course. Students in such a course are expected to attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course should contribute to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic.
The AP Chemistry course is designed to be taken only after the successful completion of a first course in high school chemistry. Surveys of students who take the AP Chemistry Exam indicate that the probability of achieving a grade of 3 or higher is significantly greater for students who successfully complete a first course in high school chemistry prior to undertaking the AP course. Thus it is strongly recommended that credit in a first-year high school chemistry course be a prerequisite for enrollment in an AP Chemistry class. In addition, the recommended mathematics prerequisite for an AP Chemistry class is the successful completion of Advanced Algebra

Environmental Science[edit]

2 semesters, usually grade 10.
This is a high school course that seeks to apply principles from all the scientific disciplines to issues of environmental care and sustainability. Especially, it will consider case studies in the environmental impact of human activities. Essential questions will include: How can we care for the creation? What issues need to be considered when making viable environmental decisions? What aspects of modern life-style are hindering/helping the care of the environment?
Prerequisite skills: Biology is recommended.

Physics[edit]

2 semesters, grades 10 - 12.
This is a regular high school physics course which covers concepts in classical mechanics, waves, sound and an introduction to electricity. Concurrent enrollment in a math course is encouraged. Students are challenged to consider the following questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us?, What are some aspects of science that have an impact on society? Students can take one of the AP Physics courses the following year if they choose to.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Algebra 2.

AP Physics 1[edit]

2 semesters, grades 10-12, Advanced Placement course.
This is a college-level physics course which covers topics in classical mechanics, waves, sound, and an introduction to electricity. Concurrent enrollment in a higher-level math course is encouraged. Students are challenged to consider the following questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us?, What are some aspects of science that have an impact on society? Students who complete the course should be adequately prepared for the Advanced Placement Physics 1 exam.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Algebra 2. Enrollment in a higher-level math course is recommended.

AP Physics 2[edit]

2 semesters, on demand, grades 11 or 12.
This is a college-level physics course which covers topics in fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics and quantum physics. Concurrent enrollment in a higher-level math course is encouraged. Students are challenged to consider the following questions: How can we see God’s creative power in the world around us? What are our responsibilities in the area of protecting and maintaining the resources God has given us?, What are some aspects of science that have an impact on society? Students who complete the course should be adequately prepared for the Advanced Placement Physics 2 exam.
Entry skills / Prerequisite: Physics 1, Algebra 2, although Precalculus is recommended.

Robotics[edit]

2 semesters, subject to demand.
This is a beginning course in robotics. We will be using VEX EDR robot kits, Robot C software, Virtual Worlds and Autodesk Inventor. Students will start off learning with the Claw-Bot about engineering, engineering problem solving and basic programming. They will be given basic introductions to VEX EDR robots and Autodesk® Inventor®. Topics will include programming, sensors, logic, building basics, gear ratios, torque and friction, project management, scientific method based decision making. However, the main learning is going to revolve around the inquiry of the student. Learners are expected to be active participants and they can take their learning beyond the classroom.

World Languages[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Japanese, Foundations[edit]

2 semesters
This course is intended for students with little or no previous knowledge of Japanese. Hiragana, katakana, and kanji are taught in the context of the cultural content the student is learning. Students will study basic grammar forms and conversation styles to support basic a daily life. Cultural studies are emphasized in speeches, presentations, and projects.

Japanese, Intermediate[edit]

2 semesters
This course increases the challenge level of conversation, grammar, reading, and writing simple compositions. Cultural studies are emphasized in speeches, presentations, and projects. The course emphasizes the use of Japanese for active communication in a wider variety of situations in daily life.
Prerequisite: Japanese, Beginner

Japanese, Advanced[edit]

2 semesters
This course focuses on refining the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing for proficiency in Japanese. Students study increasingly complex grammar and practice oral and writing skills. With advanced vocabulary and kanji, students present projects and write compositions. Some activities in preparation for the AP Japanese exam will be provided to students who desire to take it.
Prerequisite: Japanese, Intermediate

Japanese, Comprehensive[edit]

2 semesters
This course is for students who have completed Advanced Japanese, or comparable language training. In this course students demonstrate and apply comprehensively the speaking, reading, and writing skills that they have already mastered. The course is organized around themes that are related to Japanese culture, social issues, and environmental issues. Although this course is not an AP Japanese course, its content and instruction are complementary for students wishing to take the AP Japanese exam. This class is conducted fully in Japanese.

Japanese Composition[edit]

2 semesters
This course is for students with near-native level Japanese skills who have had significant training in Japanese language either through formal Japanese education, family environment, and/or other backgrounds that provided solid support in developing their language skills. This course aims to further develop and cultivate each student’s Japanese skills, specifically in reading and writing. This course is not an extension of other Japanese courses taught at CAJ. No formal assistance for the AP Japanese exam will be provided during class.
This class is conducted fully in Japanese.

Japanese Literature and Society[edit]

2 semesters
(Taught every other year, alternating with Japanese: 20th Century Authors)
This course is designed for students with native Japanese language skills. This class, conducted fully in Japanese, focuses on the study of selected works by Japanese authors that deal with linguistics, geography, history, religion, and culture. Students are expected to have Japanese skills high enough to read, comprehend, analyze, and critique all reading material in Japanese. Students are also expected to demonstrate of such responses to their reading in written Japanese. The objective of this course is to enhance each students’ Japanese language skills in order to understand and appreciate Japanese culture further and deeper, and to love and serve the Japanese people as Christ taught us. Prerequisite: Native level Japanese skills, significant amount of formal Japanese education or equivalent.
No formal assistance for the AP Japanese exam will be provided during class.

Japanese Literature: 20th Century Authors[edit]

2 semesters
(Taught every other year, alternating with Japanese: Literature and Society)
This course is designed for students with native Japanese language skills. This class, conducted fully in Japanese, focuses on the study of selected 20th century Japanese authors and their notable works. Students are expected to have Japanese skills high enough to read, comprehend, analyze, and critique the works of 20th century Japanese authors in the original language. Students are also expected to demonstrate of such responses to literary works in written Japanese. The objective of this course is to enhance each students’ Japanese language skills in order to understand and appreciate Japanese culture further and deeper, and to love and serve the Japanese people as Christ taught us. Prerequisite: Native level Japanese skills, significant amount of formal Japanese education or equivalent.
No formal assistance for the AP Japanese exam will be provided during class.

Spanish[edit]

Spanish I[edit]

2 semesters
Spanish I is an introduction to the four basic skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students begin writing short compositions within the first nine weeks. Cultural studies of Spanish speaking countries are woven throughout the curriculum. Religious vocabulary is increased through the use of Spanish Bible texts for devotions and the memorization of Bible verses in Spanish.

Spanish II[edit]

2 semesters
Spanish II reviews and continues conversation, complex grammar, and advanced reading, listening, and writing assignments. Cultural studies continue to be woven throughout the curriculum. Students will begin giving short speeches in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Spanish I.

Spanish III and IV[edit]

2 semesters, subject to demand.
Spanish III and IV review and continue conversation, advanced grammar, reading, listening, and writing. Cultural studies are presented with each unit emphasizing a different geographical area of the Hispanic world. Literature for each unit is also presented. Students give longer speeches in Spanish.
The courses also teach to the Spanish SAT which students should be prepared to take in November.


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Courses: Correspondence[edit]

Students may take CAJ-approved correspondence courses to make up classes they did not pass. Students are not to take correspondence courses to complete required classes unless specifically directed by the principal to do so. For a correspondence course to be approved, parents must contact the registrar with a request, and the registrar will submit the request to the principal for a final decision.


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Course load[edit]

CAJ reserves the right to help a student to manage his/her course load.

  • Seven courses and a study hall are considered a full course load in any semester.
  • Every high school student must have 1 study hall. Second study halls are granted at the discretion of the HS Principal.
  • Intentional exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis depending on a student’s needs. Please contact the registrar (registrar@caj.or.jp).

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Courses: Adding Dropping[edit]

There are two occasions where students are able to add/drop classes:

  1. A student can add/drop a class before the end of the school year prior to when the course will be taken if there is space and/or the change does not adversely affect the class balance.
  2. A student may also drop/add classes before the end of the first week of school with the permission of the HS principal. However, changes will only be granted under the following conditions:
    • The student completed a summer school course that allows them to take a course in which they could not enroll.
    • There is space in the class in which they desire to enroll.
    • The change does not adversely affect other classes.


If a student wants to drop a class after the first two full weeks of school to take a study hall, the student must provide a written request by a parent and can withdraw with a WP (withdraw while passing) or WG (withdraw with grade), neither of which affects the GPA. AP students can change from AP to the regular course by September 30 without it affecting the transcript. Students who change from AP to the regular course after September 30 will receive a W (withdraw) for the AP class.
All elective classes are yearlong. There will not be any elective changes after the first semester.

  • Students enrolled in yearlong electives (such as chemistry, and AP calculus) are expected to take the class for both semesters. Exceptions may be granted by the principal, based on a written appeal by the parent and in consultation with appropriate teaching staff.

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Courses: Repeating[edit]

A student may repeat a class he/she has passed, with the permission of the principal. (For example, students who earn grades of C- or below in math may be asked to repeat a class and earn a higher grade to be eligible for the next level of math.) The student may earn credit for the repeated course; if the course is a graduation requirement, the repeated course will count as elective credit. 


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Courses: Independent[edit]

Independent study courses using CAJ staff are not offered. In specific and rare circumstances intentional exceptions might be made. The principal must approve all independent study courses that use CAJ staff or that are to be included on the CAJ transcript in advance.


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Advanced Placement[edit]

AP (Advanced Placement) courses are college-level courses taken by high school students worldwide.

  • AP courses provide students an opportunity to take classes with additional rigor and depth.
  • These classes have an increased workload (1+ hours of homework per day) and include an exam (usually in May), on which, if students do well enough, colleges may award credit.
    • Students are expected to be self-motivated and diligent.
    • Many of the courses have specific prerequisites and admission criteria.
    • AP information is available from the registrar Registrar@caj.ac.jp
    • To be eligible for enrollment, students must:
      • have a cumulative GPA of 3.0,
      • have a grade of B or better in the subject area this year,
      • attend a meeting with the AP teacher to learn about the course,
      • have their parents sign a form indicating that they understand that AP classes involve a significant amount of work, and increased fees as well.
      • Exceptions to these criteria may be granted by the principal.
  • GPA Scale: For grades of C- or above in AP classes, 0.5 GPA point will be added (AP A = 4.5, AP B = 3.5, C = 2.5). see Grade Point Average
  • There is a ¥30,000 fee for AP classes that offsets (but does not completely cover) the cost of the test and AP materials.

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